Tag Archives: patch of the day

Patch of the day – Happy little polymeters

Time for a new patch! This one is all about skippy electronic space bubbles.

 

The melody is a conversation between orderly euclidean rhythms (courtesy of my shiny new 2hp Euclid) and the chaotic randomised voltages from the ever-dependable Music Thing Modular Turing Machine. The random note pitches come out of the Turing Machine, and the basic shuffle rhythm comes from the Euclid, but the Turing Machine’s Pulses expander also throws in an extra pip from time to time which adds splashes of interest. Lovely.

The reverse delay is some sort of magic achieved by the Synthesis Technology E560 Deflector Shield patched into the feedback line of the Befaco Crush Delay. There’s this one knob on the Deflector Shield I normally leave at zero, and here it’s at five-ish. I don’t know what it’s doing exactly but it sounds quite nice.

Add slatherings of spring reverb to taste.

Patch of the day: They interrupt ladies and gentlemen

Have some sound art.

The original sample is a snatch of the Mercury Theater’s infamous “War of the Worlds” broadcast, looped to twist its meaning. The chief glitch mangler effect here is a PT2399 digital delay chip living inside the Befaco Crush Delay v2. Its delay length is being automatically modulated by four stacked modulation sources – two random, two cyclic – via a Befaco A*B+C attenuverter/offsetter. The strength & offset of the delay modulation and feedback strength of the delay were manually manipulated during the recording.

tl;dr = it’s like autechre but funnier

Sample source from http://mercurytheatre.info/

Patch of the day – frequency splatter

Finally took delivery of a Synthesis Technology E560 Deflector Shield today! This first patch tweaks the speed of the frequency shift in reaction to the volume of John Cage‘s speech. The louder John Cage speaks, the more bubbly and swirly he sounds. Sounds wicked sci-fi in headphones. 🙂

Patch of the day: Space drips

It’s rainy here so I made some cosmic trickling noises.

I start with a clock signal. That clock signal goes into a random shift register which spits out a different new voltage every time the clock ticks. The voltage goes into a voltage-controlled filter with its resonance control set high so it’ll ring if it stays on one voltage for more than a fraction of a second.

The bandpass output of that filter goes into the aux path of a (crunchy) digital delay – this means there’s feedback path between the delay and the filter which “remembers” what noise the filter was just making and feeds it back to the filter as an input. This creates a subtle fade effect from one “drip” to the next.

Enjoy! 🙂